Q & A: Squatting Questions…


Yesterday I received an email from fellow master lifter, Steve Peterson. Steve is based out of West Richland, Washington and is currently getting ready for the APF Master Nationals, being held at the end of May in Baton Rouge, LA. Steve is currently ranked 4th in the squat, 6th in the deadlift and 9th for total on Powerliftingwatch.com’s Master Men’s rankings. He has a 925 lbs. squat and is looking to break that 1,000 lb. barrier in May. I was glad to help him with some advice, the email chain is below.

Joe,
 
I need to pick your brain. Are you only squatting once a week? No speed day?
 
I am 8.5 weeks out from Masters Nationals. Got a good template you could throw out for me to bump me over 1000?
 
I did a 925 my last meet in Oct. Then I had my prostate removed due to cancer. They got it all.
 
My template has been Monday: Speed Bench, Tricep work. Tuesday: lower back and upper back work. Thursday: Max effort bench, tricep work.
 
Saturdays: Max effort squat, Have SSB, Cambered bar, Texas Squat bar. Rotating all.
 
Can’t wait to get your book. I want a signed one brother!
 
Thank you,
Steve

My Reply:

Steve,

First, I’m sorry to hear about the cancer and I glad to hear everything is going well now.

As for your questions, I always squat twice a Week, unless I deadlift on the heavy (max) day. I don’t like to miss light (speed) days at all. Those are the days to get the soreness out. I like to have at least three days between the heavy and light day. If I squat on Monday, I do speed on Thursday. From what you stated, it looks like you already split your week up appropriately; just add the speed squats on Tuesday and take the back exercises a little lighter.

Now, leading into a meet, save most of the effort on the max days. As the max day workouts get harder and the weights get heavier, lower the weights on the speed days. Normally, on a speed day you would do squats for 10 sets of doubles with 40-50% of your max weight. Drop the percentage down to about 20-30%. Use these days to recover and work on form.

As for a meet program, I usually start 12 – 13 Weeks out.  This is my current program going into the APF Single-Ply Nationals.

Week 1:  Safety Bar – Raw
Week 2: Box Deadlifts – Raw
Week 3: Band Assisted Squats – Raw
Week 4: Chain Squats – Raw
Week 5: Deadlifts – Suited
Week 6: Squat – Briefs Only
Week 7: Safety Bar Squat – Briefs Only
Week 8: Chain Squats – Suited
Week 9: Deadlifts – Suited
Week 10: Band Assisted – Suited to 115-120% of max at the top
Week 11: Squat – Suited to 90-95% of Goal
Week 12: Squat – 3 sets 5 reps with warm-up weight
Week 13: Meet Day!

As you can see, I like to start off a meet program doing the exercises raw. This gives me a good gauge of where I am strength wise. As the weeks progress, I will start with the briefs, so I can start getting my body used to handling the heavier weights. By the time I’m five weeks out, I start with the suit, again allowing me to go heavier and get even more accustomed to the heavy weights.

If you have chains and bands then try to incorporate chain squats and band assisted squats when you are about 5 weeks out. Either one of these exercises allows you to overload the top-end weight.

You want the top-end weight to be around 15 – 20% over your max. Now this may sound crazy, but if you use a lot of chain weight on the chain squats or a lot of bands on the band assisted squats, then it’s not so bad.

Let’s say you use 300 lbs. of chain weight, with your max of 925 lbs. you would need to go up to 1,060 lbs. at the top (15% over max). In the hole the weight will only be 1,060 – 300 = 760 lbs. (around 80% of your max). Now add another 60 lbs. of chains. Still at the top the weight is 1,060 lbs.  Taking away 360 lbs. leaves 700 lbs. (76 % of max).  This will do two things. First it will get you used to un-racking weight much heavier than your 1,000 lb. goal.  Second, you will be able to work on blasting the weight up out of the hole. The same theory applies to the band assisted squats. You will want to do these exercises fully suited so you get used to the heavy weight in your gear.

As for the rest of the program, two weeks out is for working out the kinks in the gear and to push yourself to a heavy weight that’s close to your goal. One week out if for rest, take it light and do some reps. Just enough to get the blood flowing but not enough to feel sore.

As for light days, as I said earlier, the heavier you go on the max days, the lighter you go on the light days. I only use 235 lbs. for my speed sets when I’m in the middle of a meet program, sometimes only 195 lbs.

I hope this helps. If you have any questions, let me know.

Good luck and keep me informed.

Joe

GO MOVE SOME METAL!

teamjaxfl@gmail.comhttp://www.youtube.com/Teamjaxflhttps://twitter.com/#!/MonsterSquathttp://www.facebook.com/MonsterSquathttp://about.me/joeironmannorman

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About joeironmannorman

Powerlifter with Teamjax, out of Jacksonville Follow me on twitter: https://twitter.com/#!/MonsterSquat View all posts by joeironmannorman

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